PSORIASIS, A CHRONIC DERMATOLOGICAL DISEASE, A LITTLE DIFFICULT TO LIVE WITH!

Living in society and in a family is already complicated in the logic of things. But it will be even worse when you live with a chronic disease, including psoriasis, which is a chronic skin disease that is relatively difficult to live with. Learning that you have a chronic disease, whatever it is, can hurt you even more. And it takes time to learn to live with it.

WHAT EXACTLY IS PSORIASIS?

Affecting about 3% of the population in France with varying degrees of severity, psoriasis is an inflammatory skin disease. It is a non-contagious disease characterized by erythematous scaly lesions which are redness topped by numerous scales (excess dead cells that accumulate), i.e. the thin flakes of skin become detached from the epidermis. Psoriasis can affect any part of the body, including elbow psoriasis, scalp psoriasis, facial psoriasis, nail psoriasis, and so on. The lymphocytes, becoming hyperactive, quickly produce a substance that stimulates the blood vessels and the skin. There are several factors that trigger this. In addition, there is also another form of psoriasis, namely psoriatic arthritis causing pain in the joints.

PSORIASIS: A CHRONIC GENETIC DISEASE

As stated previously, psoriasis is a non-contagious disease. Rather, it is a genetic and environmental disease that is triggered only after an episode of stress/emotional shock, or viral or bacterial infections, or too much sun exposure, or even the taking of certain drugs such as lithium, beta blockers, or alcohol and tobacco. Even if it is a genetic disease, it does not necessarily appear at birth. In addition, there can also be many pathological conditions that can quickly trigger psoriasis such as obesity, cholesterol disorders, metabolic disease otherwise known as fatty liver disease.

PSORIASIS, A LITTLE DIFFICULT TO LIVE WITH

When you live with a chronic disease like psoriasis, it is like being forced to voluntarily isolate yourself from the world. There is nothing painful about hearing comments or putting up with the looks of others. From a professional point of view, it can become impossible for people with psoriasis to carry on with their activities, especially for those who have direct contact with clients. This disease obviously leaves psychological scars. You may no longer have self-esteem, and you may no longer be able to enjoy life as you wish. And yes, you can’t dress like everyone else, because all you want to do is hide the plaques.